RADICAL WORKERS’ BLOC AT TOLPUDDLE 2019

Tolpuddle Martyrs Festival and rally 2019 Friday, 19th to Sunday, 21st July 2019. View map No stall this year, apparently they were “oversubscribed”. Nah we don’t either, more time to get drunk then.

On the plus side the IWW are back, with a new improved stall run by Dorset branch.

Wob kitchen will run from Friday evening to Sunday lunch, next to the Big Tent; you’ll hardly notice the difference. Wessex Solidarity will make some of our literature catalogue available on the day. We’ve lots of new stuff that isn’t in the reference library as we’re running out of storage space – it hasn’t been updated for years. Why not get in touch now if there’s a subject you’re particularly interested in.

Catering Cadre: Comrade Les, our Wob kitchen chef is offering free training on outside and event catering for Radical Workers and groups who want to feed their members, homeless or unemployed workers in a safe and cost-effective way. Topics including:

  • Basic Health safety and hygiene.
  • Basic budget and Menu planning.
  • Basic dietary requirements.
  • Basic safe use of LPG and Butane gas cookers.

Let us know if you’re interested or come and see us about it at the festival.

Safe Space Policy: “don’t be a dick”.

This year we ask Radical Workers to be especially kind to members of the Prison Officers Association, as they are ever so sensitive, and easily upset by loud noises and rude words.

Bloody hell it was hot! Tolpuddle R.W.B. 2018

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Oxford students are boycotting their Union Society after a Katie Hopkins invite

gal-dem

A boycott of the Oxford Union has been launched in opposition to far-right figureheads being invited to speak at the student society. In an open letter first posted to Twitter on Sunday, students, academics and Oxford residents expressed “firm and uncompromising opposition to all forms of fascism and racism”, calling on others to boycott all events hosted by the union. The petition has received 348 signatures so far.

The protest comes in light of the union’s invitation to fascist media personality Katie Hopkins, to speak at a debate about “no platforming” on Thursday. The open letter reads: “This is a woman whose hateful views, including comments directed at refugees, migrants, Jews, Muslims, the mentally ill and the LGBTQ+ community have led to her being fired from LBC Radio.”

Katie isn’t the first far-right speaker to be invited to speak – previous guests include David Irving, Nick Griffin and Tommy Robinson. The open letter continues: “These events form part of a decades long pattern of inviting proponents of hate into Oxford… The union has ignored repeated and widespread calls from Oxford students, staff and residents to withdraw invitations to such figures.”

The letter goes on to demand that the society immediately “cease hosting fascists and racists” and that videos of visits by Tommy Robinson, Steve Bannon, Marine Le Pen and Mahathir Bin Mohamad are pulled from the society’s YouTube channel.

The Oxford Union Society, not be confused with Oxford SU (the students’ union), was founded in 1823 and is one of the Britain’s oldest university unions. Like Cambridge and Durham, Oxford’s “Union Society”, is an exclusive debating platform that carries hefty membership fees. At present, it costs £278.10 to join (however it offers “access membership” at £164.80). [… 736 more words]

Full post

You can sign the campaign’s open letter here.

“No platform” – what it means and what it doesn’t mean – Mal Content.

Anna is with us, we fight on! Bristol Antifascists Demo 16.03.19

Bristol Antifascists are joining with other radical groups and comrades in Bristol for a demonstration on 16th March to remember our amazing and inspiring comrade Anna Campbell. We also want to show our shared commitment to all that she stood for and towards the better world she fought so hard for.

Here’s some of the struggles Anna gave so much to and which we carry on:

Anarchism, Anti capitalism, Feminism, Anti Patriarchy, Queer struggle, Antifascism, Animal liberation, Hunt sabotage, Prison abolition, Defendant solidarity, Ecological struggle, Eviction resistance, Direct action…

Join us! Meet 2pm near the International Brigades plaque in Castle Park, between the church and the river.

15th March 2019 marks the first anniversary of when we lost Anna Campbell. Anna went out to Rojava, the Kurdish region of Syria, to join the Kurdish struggle against fascism. She was inspired by the revolution because of the politics of direct democracy, feminism and environmentalism and fought with the YPJ (Women’s Protection Units), who have been at the forefront in the fight against ISIS. Anna was killed by a Turkish airstrike whilst defending the city of Afrin.

Anna lived in Bristol before she left for Rojava, and throughout her life was active in many groups and causes, including prison abolition, feminism, anti-fascism and animal liberation.

Join with us to remember Anna and all those who have fallen in the struggle, and to take a stand for all that she, and we, believe in. The demonstration will be followed by a gathering at Hydra Bookshop, where Anna volunteered, to launch a zine made by Anna’s friends and comrades and to (hopefully) link up with the Internationalist Commune in Rojava.. If you have ideas or contributions for the gathering on please get in touch by email.

Friends, comrades and all those who wish to remember Anna and others are welcome.

Bristol Antifascists

Bristol IWW

facebook event

https://alternativebristol.com/events/anna-is-with-us-we-fight-on/

Witchcraft, Gender, & Marxism | Philosophy Tube

Federici ‘mansplained’ (very neatly)

Support Dorset Eye – Independent Citizen Media

Via www.dorseteye.com

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“Dorset Eye covers the news that really matters to us here and is not afraid to state the facts. Dorset Eye has really helped get the message out about what is happening to our Dorset NHS – the huge losses at Poole Hospital A&E and Maternity, 245 acute beds across the county, and community hospitals in Portland, Wareham, Ferndown, Westhaven and Alderney. Crucially, Dorset Eye has not shied away from sharing clear evidence of the risk to life inherent in the CCG plans.”

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The Dorset Eye team

“No platform” – what it means and what it doesn’t mean. By Mal Content.

A great deal of B.S. has emanated from the chattering classes in recent years around this term. You’d be forgiven for thinking it originated in academia, where vested interests compete for the right/privilege of influencing impressionable minds. We are told that debate is being shut down, that intellectual development will be stunted if student bodies decline to entertain purveyors of hackneyed reactionary views, which might provide a stimulating foil to contemporary orthodoxy. Trouble is, we’ve heard it all before.

Fascism never took off in Britain, in the sense that it never gained the executive and slaughtered or imprisoned a significant proportion of the population, as it did in many other countries. This despite it having a sizeable constituency, being well funded and having the sympathy of the establishment. The bitter experience of Italy, Germany, Portugal and Spain taught that appealing to the bourgeois ‘authorities’ to uphold constitutional values was futile. It turned out they would only ban events that threatened good civic order and commerce.

Such appeals to decency and morality were taken as signs of weakness, and only emboldened the fascists. Physical superiority was central to fascist ideology, so the only way to halt their progress was to beat them at their own game. Time and again, their attempts to insert a respectable presence into a community through paper sales and public meetings were thwarted by Working Class people, not all politically affiliated, who would rather see a riot in their back yard than a fascist parade.

In 1945, after six years of war against Nazi Germany, a British labour government permitted the fascists detained under Regulation 18b to resume their activities, and gave them a police escort wherever they went. They were joined by Axis prisoners of war who were supposedly being rehabilitated. Apart from Spain and Portugal, which retained fascist governments, the only country in Europe where it was legal to glorify Hitler and the holocaust was Britain.

Mosely’s comeback was thwarted by the 43 Group, formed by Jewish ex-service personnel and their allies. Their game was to knock over the speakers’ platform, forcing the cops to shut the event on public order grounds. This task would be accomplished by selected ‘commandoes’, many of whom had actually performed that role during the war. They would quietly take their places in the hall, then at a pre-arranged signal charge in wedge formation at the line of stewards protecting the platform. A large and well-stewarded meeting could require several wedges, precisely timed and co-ordinated. Other supporters would heckle and pick fights in the audience.

Nor did they set out to stifle debate. In his eponymous history of the 43 Group (highly recommended) Morris Beckman recalls that often dialogue with fascist supporters commenced after they had received a good hiding, and there were defections at all levels. Politicians and other worthies wrung their hands in shame as the Working Class cleaned up its own mess.

Rough justice was similarly dished out by London’s Caribbean migrants in the 1950’s and by the regional Asian Youth Movements of the 1970’s. The phrase “no platform” was well established by the time I first experienced antifascism at the end of that decade. It isn’t about supplication; it’s a simple ultimatum to those in power: “Call your dogs off or we’ll tear the place up”.

Your original snowflakes weren’t students asking for safe space, they were Jewish commandoes, their wives, girlfriends and mates, Asian youths, rude boys, miners, dockers, Brighton rockers, and East End pugilists looking after their manor. There isn’t, and never has been, a right to free speech – liberals don’t go asking the state to grant it. For a detailed explanation of how and why the state grants rights, see here: It’s a useful social skill not to piss off those around you to the extent they want to hurt you. So if your career path relies on vilifying, excluding or slandering the poor, migrants, LGBT people etc, making others fear for their safety, and you fear for your safety as a result, that’s fine by me. If you’ve got a contentious opinion you aren’t prepared to physically stand up for, I won’t give it the time of day.

Ripper museum still open! Class War picket 10th November