Late June/early July class struggle round-up

Cautiously pessimistic

A few upcoming events: On Monday 1st, there’s an emergency protest to save the London Black Women’s Project, which is threatened with closure. Also in the coming week, on Tuesday 2nd London Anarchist Communist Group are hosting a showing of the film Rebellion in Patagonia, a 1974 film about a historical uprising in Argentina. On

[…] More

Advertisements

Still fighting!

Bristol Anarchist Black Cross - Prisoner Support

This is a statement from a comrade we have been supporting through the courts and persistent police harassment. We admire their determination to carry on resisting despite being targetted and their willingness to speak up and expose the cops for what they are. Their words are a good example of the courage and integrity necessary for fighting to win:

Still fighting!

It was only a “No”. The sentence resonates inside of me. It was only a “No” and they tried to make me pay for telling them where to get off. For fighting them in court. For having the “wrong politics”. For not being white. It was only a “No”, yet for over a year and a half since that day and since my fight to clear my name began, it has felt like forever.At the time, on that cold December evening in 2017 I made it clear that I…

View original post 1,151 more words

Unquiet Graves – film review

Anarchist Communist Group

Unquiet Graves, the new documentary from Irish filmmaker Sean Murray, is an important work on several levels. It Informs the viewer of state collusion, indeed state sponsorship of sectarian murder gangs in Northern Ireland in the 1970s. It highlights this activity before the events get lost as ‘tragic history’ and it seeks some semblance of justice for the families of the victims of security services – directed paramilitary murder.

The film begins with a re-enactment of the murder of two young men, Colm McCartney and Sean Farmer, in 1975. Returning from a Gaelic football game in Dublin, the two were stopped at a ‘British Army’ checkpoint near the village of Newtownhamilton in County Armagh and shot dead. This murder, which came three years into the sectarian murder campaign, is returned to, with great poignancy in animated form later in the film.

A large part of the film’s content is based upon more than 15 years of research undertaken by the Pat Finucane Centre, a human rights advocacy organisation in Northern Ireland, much of which was published in the book Lethal Allies: British Collusion in Ireland (2013). The book catalogued the concerted activities of the Loyalist paramilitary Mid Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), elements of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) and the locally recruited Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR), part of the British Army in what became known as the Tyrone-Armagh Murder triangle.

Much of the evidence of collusion was provided by one of the active participants, John Weir. Weir, was a sergeant in the RUC’s Special Patrol Group (SPG) counter-terrorist section and member of the UVF. His 1999 affidavit outlined in detail the consistent collusion between security services and Loyalist Paramilitaries in the Murder Triangle and beyond.

The modus operandi was to select ‘soft’ targets, concentrating upon ‘respectable’ Catholic individuals and families without connections to the Republican movement. The highest profile killings were that of members of the Miami Showband pop group in July 1975, but that was an exception. The targets would be chosen, the surveillance and logistic support provided by the security services and the murders carried out by a mix of off, and sometimes on-duty RUC men, UDR soldiers and UVF members. RUC roadblocks, which were normalised in rural Tyrone and Armagh, were sometimes set up to prevent witnesses. The nominal RUC investigations into the murders returned a 100% failure to convict. Patently, the campaign was being given the go ahead by officials much further up the chain of command.

The Glennane Gang extended their operations into the Irish Republic, planting bombs in the border town of Dundalk and were responsible for the infamous car bombings of Monaghan and Dublin in May 1974 which claimed 34 lives. They undertook this operation as they did many others between 1972 and 1980, with the height of their killing between 1974 and 1976, in a state of heightened confidence that they were protected by important sections of local and national law enforcement. In total the gang has been connected to more than 120 murders. Most of their atrocities were claimed in the name of the Protestant Action Force, occasionally the Red Hand Commando – itself a part of the UVF or remained anonymous. Their intention is generally believed to have been to spread terror and panic amongst the Catholic/Nationalist community in the hope that this would provoke the Provisional IRA, then on ceasefire, into tit for tat killings. This did, to a limited but bloody extent, happen when the Republican Action Force murdered 10 Protestant building workers at Kingsmill, South Armagh in January 1976, which is highlighted in the film.

Following this sectarian revenge attack, the Glennane Gang formulated a plan to massacre Catholic school children and their teachers in the Armagh village of Beleeks. The intention can only have been to escalate the situation into open civil war, drawing in the Republican movement and forcing the hand of the British state and any reticent Loyalists.

However, the leadership of the UVF, who were contemporaneously turning a blind eye to the horrifically brutal Shankill Butchers, were unwilling to sanction the slaughter of innocent primary school children and the inevitable international condemnation it would have brought.

There are ongoing attempts to uncover the full truth about the Glennane Gang and its connections to the secret, and not too secret, state, attempts which have been hampered at every turn, despite the Good Friday Agreement, and the ostensible embracing of openness and reconciliation.

The documentary gives an opportunity for the perspectives and voices of the victim’s families to be foregrounded and the interviews with the relatives of those murdered are moving and powerful. The struggle for the truth about collusion and state terror continues.

Try to see this important film. More info HERE
Anarchist Communist Group

Santiago Xanica Demands Recognition of Their Indigenous Municipal Council (Oaxaca)

This communiqué comes from the Indigenous community of Santiago Xanica in the southern sierra mountains of Oaxaca. The communiqué demands recognition of an Indigenous municipal council in the community, following almost three years of incompetence by the supposed elected municipal authority. The original in Spanish was published by Noticias de Abajo ML and can be…

Voices in Movement

Asking where does power really lie?

A short while ago we wrote this post – Ploughing on regardless in utter contempt of public opinion – about the way Clare Panniker (joint Chief Executive of Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust + others) decided to plough on with as much of the merger of hospitals in Thurrock, Basildon, Southend and Mid Essex as is possible. This is despite councillors in Southend and Thurrock voting to refer the planned merger back to the Secretary of State for Health. It’s been noted that a lot of people saw this as an unelected, unaccountable executive sticking two fingers up at what’s left of local democracy.

We now have this from Lyn Carpenter, the Chief Executive Officer of Thurrock Council: “The council needs to take a long, hard look in the mirror and restore local councillors and the residents we represent to the heart of the decision-making process.” Rather…

View original post 455 more words

Red And Black Telly: BORIS – SPOUSAL ABUSE, OR WORSE ?

Representing What? The Rt Hon. Sajid Javid, Home Secretary

Architects for Social Housing (ASH)

Sajid Javid was elected to be the Conservative Member of Parliament for the West Midlands constituency of Bromsgrove with 33,493 in the General Election of 2017. 1,196 more words

Original post