The first militant, the first comrade, the first martyr

Internationalist Commune

Haki Karer, internationalistic co-founder of the PKK

Interview with Mustafa Karasu, by İsmet Kayhan | Kurdistan Report Nr. 202

Haki Karer (fourth from left) as a student at Ankara University. | Photo: ANF

The years in which Haki Karer began to study at the university were the years of strong repression as a result of the military coup of March 12, 1971. The effects of the resistance of the revolutionary leaders Deniz Gezmiş, Mahir Çayan and İbrahim Kaypakkaya against the fascism of March 12 shaped Haki Karer very much. He took a place in the front ranks of revolutionary youth resistance, which spread like an avalanche from 1973. During this time, from 1973 onwards, he personally got to know the leaders of the left-wing and revolutionary youth movements. The person who shaped him most and was to change his life was the Kurdish leading personality Abdullah Öcalan.

Haki Karer met Öcalan in 1972 and from then on their paths did not part. The central reason that brought these two revolutionaries together was the ideological line that saw the liberation of Kurdish and Turkish society as a unity.

Haki Karer lost his life on 18 May 1977 as a result of a plot by the “Sterka Sor” after a year at Dîlok (Antep). His death was to deeply affect Öcalan and his friends. Öcalan called his companion Haki Karer his “secret soul”. Mustafa Karasu, a member of the Executive Council of the Community of Societies of Kurdistan (KCK), has reported on Haki Karer’s organizational activities within the workers and students of Dîlok and on the ideological struggle with the Turkish left circles. Karasu, who also took part in the funeral of Haki Karer, spoke extensively about this time.

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International Solidarity From Anarchists in Mexico City

Voices in Movement


This communique comes from anarchists in Mexico City; a humble gesture of solidarity with comrades facing state repression throughout the world.

From Mexico City, we send our solidarity and love to the comrades who took the streets on May 1st, and to the many who were kidnapped by the state as a result. Repression is the state’s reaction to a gnawing fear: a fear of the power of revolt, of the autonomous organization of the people, of the brewing revolution.

We stand in solidarity with the 300+ compañerxs detained in Paris, France; the 600+ compañerxs detained in Bandung, Indonesia; and the 12 anarchists being processed in Brussels, Belgium; for taking their revolutionary rage to the streets in the face of stiff state repression. We stand in solidarity with all the social fighters that remain behind bars or are being persecuted by the state for their commitment to the destruction of domination and oppression in its various forms.

Solidarity has no borders. You all are not alone. From our geography here in Mexico City, together with you all, we commit to continue the struggle against states and capitalism.

Burn the prisons! Fuck the police! Free Miguel Peralta!

Oxford students are boycotting their Union Society after a Katie Hopkins invite

gal-dem

A boycott of the Oxford Union has been launched in opposition to far-right figureheads being invited to speak at the student society. In an open letter first posted to Twitter on Sunday, students, academics and Oxford residents expressed “firm and uncompromising opposition to all forms of fascism and racism”, calling on others to boycott all events hosted by the union. The petition has received 348 signatures so far.

The protest comes in light of the union’s invitation to fascist media personality Katie Hopkins, to speak at a debate about “no platforming” on Thursday. The open letter reads: “This is a woman whose hateful views, including comments directed at refugees, migrants, Jews, Muslims, the mentally ill and the LGBTQ+ community have led to her being fired from LBC Radio.”

Katie isn’t the first far-right speaker to be invited to speak – previous guests include David Irving, Nick Griffin and Tommy Robinson. The open letter continues: “These events form part of a decades long pattern of inviting proponents of hate into Oxford… The union has ignored repeated and widespread calls from Oxford students, staff and residents to withdraw invitations to such figures.”

The letter goes on to demand that the society immediately “cease hosting fascists and racists” and that videos of visits by Tommy Robinson, Steve Bannon, Marine Le Pen and Mahathir Bin Mohamad are pulled from the society’s YouTube channel.

The Oxford Union Society, not be confused with Oxford SU (the students’ union), was founded in 1823 and is one of the Britain’s oldest university unions. Like Cambridge and Durham, Oxford’s “Union Society”, is an exclusive debating platform that carries hefty membership fees. At present, it costs £278.10 to join (however it offers “access membership” at £164.80). [… 736 more words]

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You can sign the campaign’s open letter here.

“No platform” – what it means and what it doesn’t mean – Mal Content.

Interview with a member of the Union of Anarchists of Iran and Afghanistan

Aotearoa Workers Solidarity Movement

We are used to seeing anarchism as a purely Western phenomenon. Rebellions, riots and uprisings further east are more associated with Islamists than anti-authoritarian ideas. All this generates a number of stereotypes about the inhabitants of these regions. However, it turns out that groups of anarchists exist even where American bombs fall and that people are executed for Facebook posts. Pramen interviewed the Union of Anarchists of Iran and Afghanistan.

Your group is called the Union of Anarchists of Iran and Afghanistan. What motivated you to join forces in both countries? Geographic proximity ? No language barrier? Transparency of borders? Common history?

Since anarchism leads to positions against borders and states, in the case of Iran and Afghanistan, it is important to remember that these are only names, the names of two regions. We do not justify the existence of borders and states, and we want our revolutionary demands to be universal and not related to any particular area. In general, the main reason is that comrades speak the same language and cooperate within both regions.

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March Together Against Racism Wellington 18th May 2019

Wellington Against Racism and Fascism

On Saturday, 18 May, WARF is participating in the National Day of Action against fascism and racism. At 1pm that day we will be marching against racism.

If you are keen to assist in organising this event and joining in longterm planning to stop fascism, come along to our organising meetings. We are meeting at 7.30pm on Mondays at Thistle Hall.

Email us for further details fight-racism@protonmail.com or check out our facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wellyarf/ The march is also a facebook event

Bristol Antifascists Fundraiser and Spanner Album Launch 30th March 2019

Red And Black Telly: MAY AND CORBYN U-TURN ON BREXIT.