Spain 1936, Ethiopia 2021: the fight against fascism continues …

CNT-AIT Fr

Leaflet distributed at the Vernet Concentration Camp on the occasion of Heritage Days. Because memory is useless if it does not highlight today’s struggles …

Eighty years ago, at the concentration camp Vernet d’Ariège (France), Tecle HAGOS died. The plaque on his grave reads « August 19, 1941, Ethiopian ». Not much is known about his life, except that he was probably part of a group of a dozen students from the Horn of Africa who had traveled to Spain in summer 1936. The announcement of a Revolution, made by workers and peasants, ordinary people which had triumphed over Fascism on July 19, 1936, gave them some hope, they who had seen this same Fascism seize their land in Africa few months before.

Were they Amhara, Tigrayan, Oromo, or some other Ethiopian ethnicity? We do not know and frankly we are not interested to know. Tecle Hagos and his companions had not come to give their youth for Catalonia, Aragon or Andalusia, not even for Spain, but they came for ridding Humanity of Fascism. And also because they shared with the Spanish revolutionaries a universal idea: that of establishing Liberty through Equality and Solidarity.

There, in this Horn of Europe, these sons of the Horn of Africa had shared the libertarian hopes of this people who began to dream aloud. They had also shared its disillusionment, once the politicians had regained their power in the Spanish Republic. Like the anarchists of the CNT-AIT and the militants of the POUM, some Ethiopian freedom fighters were accused without any evidence by the Communists of « treason » and eventually were slandered and also knew the the republican jails …

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Red and Black Telly roundup.









Red and Black Telly roundup.












Mayday 2021


#killthebill

France: Everyone in solidarity with the Black Feather

Aotearoa Workers Solidarity Movement

La Plume Noire, a UCL bookstore in Lyon, was attacked on Saturday March 20 by a fascist commando. It is an attack against the entire UCL, but, beyond that, against all the forces of progress and against our social camp. An attack that takes place in a nauseating climate where racist controversies are linked in the media, driven by the highest summit of the State.

The UCL took the initiative of a national appeal for support, broad and united, which received numerous signatures from unions, political organizations and parties, associations and collectives. A national event is planned in Lyon on Saturday April 3.

On Saturday March 20 at 2 p.m., the La Plume Noire bookstore located at 8 rue Diderot on the slopes of Croix-Rousse, was attacked by around fifty

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Red and Black Telly roundup.






EN/ES/DE/FR – ‘On the tightrope: Contributions and considerations from and for the anarchic combat’ – Letter by imprisoned anarchist comrade Francisco Solar

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On July 24, 2020, the anarchist comrades Monica Caballero and Francisco Solar were arrested. Francisco is accused of sending package bombs against the 54th police station and against the former Minister of the Interior, Rodrigo Hinzpeter, in July 2019, in an action claimed by “Seditious Accomplices/Fraction for Revenge“. While both are also accused of the double explosive attack against the Tánica building in the wealthy neighborhood of Vitacura on February 27, 2020, during the middle of the uprising in Chile, which was an action claimed by “Armed Affinities in Revolt“.

Both comrades are known not only for this case of repression, they have faced different repressive operations in Chile and Spain previously, but they are also known in the different environments of struggle, being active in publications, demonstrations, radio programs and initiatives against power.

On the tightrope: Contributions and considerations from and for the anarchic combat.

This text aims to contribute to the development and deepening of the informal anarchic combat, taking into consideration the increasingly specialized technological advances of control and surveillance of the population in general and, specially, of those who venture to rebel against what is established.

It arises from the need to bash the power harder and constantly in order to create cracks that can keep on growing.

It comes as no surprise to anyone

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Kill Franco!

Stuart Christie recounts the anti-Fascist resistance in post war Spain, including his own attempt to assassinate the dictator Francisco Franco.

Stuart Christie, the Eternal Young Rebel Always in the Fight for Life, by Xavier Montanyà

Kate Sharpley Library.

Stuart Christie was born in Glasgow in 1946, too late to enlist in the International Brigades and go off and fight alongside the Spanish republicans in the 1936-39 war. As a child, though, he befriended some Scottish miners who had fought with the International Brigades in that faraway war that he was to take so closely to his heart. A war for ideals that were and are universal. He used to listen in wonder to the tales they used to tell. Taking a pride in them. Such conversations moulded his sensibility to life and struggle.

He did not know it yet, but Stuart would later be ready to carry on with their fight. He would try to complete his friends’ task in Spain. From then on, that was to be his mission and his life. A commitment to the struggle that would be deployed across many fronts. Internationalist, revolutionary antifascist activism, direct action and history, publishing and investigative journalism. Stuart Christie was the real thing, a free man.

As he was to put it in the first volume of his memoirs The Christie File: Part 1, 1946-1964: My Granny Made Me An Anarchist (2002), his granny

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Mr Wu no longer has a laundry … by Mal Content.

Pondering the controversy over ‘patriotic’ songs:

‘Land of hope and glory’ is an awful dirge and anyone who claims this as part of their culture is a bit of a muppet. ‘Rule Brittania’ is only slightly more interesting, part of a long-forgotten opera about King Alfred the great, who founded the British navy. Its political message is against Scottish secession, as one who thinks Wessex should never have gone into England, I disagree.

Some years ago, for reasons that escape me now, the BBC invited the public to nominate tunes that summed up “Englishness”, or may be it was “Britishness”, I forget. My submission was ‘Mr Wu’s a Window Cleaner Now’ by the late George Formby. Formby’s irrepressible character sums up the values commonly espoused by the English Working Class: irreverent, gregarious, hard-working, resourceful, he’s never going to give up. He also represents the diverse ethnic make up of our class, even in Formby’s day.

There is a sub-text that illuminates the dark side of Englishness. Aggressively Working Class entertainer Formby, who managed to get himself deported from South Africa for defying racial segregation (it was actually Beryl Formby who told the National Party leader to “piss off”) nevertheless manages to reproduce the racial stereotypes of his day. The cheeky, womanising Mr Wu is simultaneously “one of us” and “the other”.

A real-life Mr Wu would have lived through the ‘yellow peril’ era of the early Twentieth Century, like his Jewish and Irish neighbours in the East End he would have had to take care of himself extremely well just to hold his ground. He’s still in Limehouse in 1942, when he crops up as an air-raid warden, so undoubtedly he would have fought at Cable Street in 1936, against the cops, against the law. By 1944 he’s a fighter pilot.

Maybe he went to Spain?

“He used to iron jackets,

now he’s shooting fascists,

cos’ Mr Wu’s a Brigadista now”

Or something. Next time you’re feeling ‘patriotic’ big up Mr Wu, East End Working Class hero.