Now that the Queen is dead, it’s time we bury the monarchy

gal-dem

The queues began in the night. Starting at St Giles’ Cathedral on the Royal Mile, a line of several thousands of people snaked across Edinburgh for miles, patiently waiting for the opportunity to shuffle past a 96-year-old woman’s coffin. The city jumped into action to accommodate the royal mourners: portaloos and water stops were installed along the route, while the Salvation Army arrived to hand out hot drinks and food during the cold night. Yet, elsewhere in the city, 4,500 of Edinburgh’s homeless citizens slept rough on the streets or in temporary accommodation – a figure only expected to worsen as the UK’s cost of living crisis continues into the winter.

As we’ve seen since the Queen’s death on 8 September, the UK is actually very well equipped to handle a crisis – or whatever the state deems to be one. Public billboards and advertising spaces immediately transformed to memorialise the Queen, transport services have been magicked out of thin air to accommodate mourners, and a meticulously orchestrated operation has rolled out across the country.

Where was this leap to action at the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic? Where is it now as the UK enters a cost of living crisis? Where are the hot drinks and portaloos for the people who are forced to spend every night outside? And where, exactly, are the millions of pounds that will be coughed up for the Queen’s funeral and the King’s ascension, for the parents relying on schools and a footballer to feed their children, for the pensioners riding buses to stay warm and for the 42% of us who will not be able to heat our homes by next January? The pompous display of wealth feels jarring against the worst fall in living standards for 60 years. Not only is it unnecessary, it’s deeply inappropriate.

“In modern Britain, ‘respect’ is only reserved for the wealthy – not for the most vulnerable in society”

The Queen’s death has only proven what we’ve come to know

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Red and Black Telly roundup.







Red and Black Telly roundup.














Red and Black Telly roundup.










Red and Black Telly roundup.













Red and Black Telly roundup.







Red and Black Telly roundup.







Red and Black Telly roundup.





Red and Black Telly roundup.







The Real Enemy

Anarchist Communist Group

Regents Park in London contains probably the richest street in the city. Many of the mansions here are said to be ‘worth’ £165 million. Many of these large properties are empty, while just a mile away people are left to sleep in doorways. This is the situation created by capitalism and perpetuated by conservatives and nationalists when they point their fingers at vulnerable refugees fleeing British made bombs. These properties at Regents Park should be seized and put to practical use – but you will never find conservatives or nationalists demanding or proposing that – because they are on the side of the ruling class parasites and their failing capitalist system.

The real enemy is not desperate refugees risking their lives to get to safety. The real enemy is people like the 7th Duke of Westminster, Hugh Grosvenor, who the capitalist system is set up for. His Dad left him £10 billion! He managed, due to trickery, to avoid paying £4 billion of this money in inheritance tax. £4 billion is enough money to pay the entire unemployment budget for the year, or the wages of 120,000 fire fighters, nurses and police officers- not that we as anarchists think the money should go to the police, but it gives you an idea of the sort of money we’re talking about. What does Hugh Grosvenor like to spend this money on? He likes to spend it on parties. These are the real parasites whose side all nationalists and fascists are on. There’s a very good reason they want to distract you from the real problem.

Don’t believe the lies and propaganda of the bourgeois establishment media who scapegoat working class people – whether it’s refugees, immigrants, single mums, the unemployed, the disabled or whoever it is.